Recent Calls
Sat. May 30th 2020
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Saturday night we responded to a report of a vehicle fire inside an attached garage on Wellington Ct. Upon arrival there was smoke showing and a fire in the engine compartment. The owner attempted t...
Sun. Aug 4th 2019
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This afternoon we were dispatched with Snyder Fire Department for a poss house fire on N. Union Rd. Snyder 9-5 was on location and reported a working fire. Crews made a quick knock down in the kitchen...
Fri. May 17th 2019
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An Evans Street resident remains hospitalized after being rescued from his burning apartment by Williamsville firefighters Friday morning.Vello Puust, 87, who occupies a second-floor apartment at 327 ...
Sun. Apr 7th 2019
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Williamsville Firefighters were called to the scene of a one car MVA on April 7th, 2019 at approximately 3:30 am. Upon arrival of first arriving emergency personnel, the vehicle was engulfed in fire a...
Thu. Dec 25th 2014
Wheelchair fire forces nursing home’s evacuationby KEATON T. DEPRIEST Associate Editor, Amherst Bee An electric wheelchair caught fire on Christmas night, forcing the evacuation of about 45 resi...
News Headlines
Wed. Aug 2nd 2017
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The Williamsville Fire Department recently purchased eight ballistic vests to protect its volunteer personnel against any threats that could possibly occur at emergency scenes.According to Williamsvil...
Fri. Jan 4th 2013
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Wiliamsville firefighters were dispatched to a car fire on 1/4/13, at 02:38. WFD 9-1 got on location and reported a fire in the engine compartment. The fire was extinguished, the vehicle was listed ...
Thu. Jun 28th 2012
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Williamsville's old Engine 1 (built 1947) participated in the June 23 "Grande Parade" in Fort Erie, Ontario. It was accompanied by an almost identical 1947 pumper owned by the Fort Erie LaFr...
Wed. May 30th 2012
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From the Amherst Bee - www.amherstbee.com
A Williamsville restaurant reopened for business on Tuesday morning after a Monday afternoon incident involving a vehicle that crashed into the building and ...
Mon. Sep 12th 2011
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Williamsville Firefighters responded early this morning at 0533 Hrs for a report of a garage fire on Troy Del Way. Williamsville 9-2 went on location reporting a fully involved attached garage. Comma...
Fire Prevention Tips

 

  • Install and maintain smoke alarms. Smoke alarms will warn you of a fire in time for you to escape. Install them on every level of your home and outside of each sleeping area. Test them at least once a month and replace batteries in accordance with manufacturing requirements or whenever an alarm begins to chirp, which signals the battery is low.
  • Sleep with bedroom doors closed. Closed doors provide protection against heat and smoke. Even a lightweight hollow-core door delays a fire and toxic smoke. Slowing the spread of fire to sleeping areas gives everyone more time to escape.
  • Plan and practice two ways out. Fire escape routes must not include elevators, which might take you right to the fire. Choose a meeting place outside where everyone will gather. Once you’re out, stay out! At least twice a year, have the whole family practice the escape plan.
  • Test doors before you open them. While kneeling or crouching at the door, reach up as high as you can and touch the door, the knob and the space between the door and its frame with the back of your hand. If the door is hot, use another escape route. If the door is cool, open it with caution.
  • Crawl low under smoke. Smoke is dangerous! If you encounter smoke, use an alternate escape route. If you must exit through smoke, the cleanest air will be several inches off the floor. Crawl on your hands and knees to the nearest safe exit.
  • If you are trapped, close the doors between you and the fire. Stuff the cracks around the doors to keep smoke out. Wait at a window and signal for help with light-colored cloth or a flashlight. If there’s a phone in the room, call the fire department and tell them exactly where you are.
  • Once you’re out, stay out! If a fire starts, don’t wait for anything. Just get outside. Go to your family’s meeting place. Then someone can call the fire department from a neighbor’s phone or an alarm box. Do not go back into your home for any reason, until a grownup says it’s safe.
  • Stop, Drop and Roll. Everyone should know this rule: If your clothes catch on fire, don’t run! Stop where you are, drop to the ground, cover your face with your hands to protect your face and lungs, and roll over and over to smother the flames.
  • Space heaters need space. Keep portable and space heaters at 3 feet (1 meter) from anything that can burn. Never leave heaters on when you leave home or go to bed and keep children and pets well away from them.
  • Smokers need watchers. Carelessly discarded cigarettes are the leading cause of fire deaths in the United States. Never smoke in bed or when you are drowsy! Provide large, deep ashtrays for smokers and put water on butts before discarding them. Before going to bed, check under and around sofa cushions for smoldering cigarettes.
  • Be Careful Cooking. Never leave cooking unattended. Keep cooking areas clear of combustibles and wear short or tight-fitting sleeves when you cook. Keep the handles of your pots turned inward so the pots can't be knocked or pulled over. If grease catches fire, carefully slide a lid over the pan to smother the flames, then turn off the burner. Never put foil or other metals in a microwave oven.
  • Matches and lighters are tools, not toys. In the hands of a child, matches and lighters are deadly. Store them up high where kids can't reach them, preferably in a locked cabinet. And teach your children from the start that matches and lighters are tools for adults, not toys for kids. If children find matches or lighters, they should tell a grown-up immediately.
  • Use electricity safely. If an appliance smokes or has an unusual smell, unplug it immediately and have it repaired. Replace any electrical cord that is cracked or frayed. Don't overload extension cords or run them under rugs. Don't tamper with the fuse box or use fuses of an improper size.
  • Cool a burn. If someone gets burned, immediately place the wound in cool water for 10 to 15 minutes. If the burn blisters or chars, see a doctor immediately.

 


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